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Inoculants have potential for high soya bean yield

Some Farmers in the East Gonja district of the Northern region have noted that inoculants have the potential to boost their soya beans production in the 2014/2015 cropping season.

According to the farmers numbering about five hundred, applying inoculants to soya bean seed before planting has enhanced their crops from germination to the pod development stage, and even though they are yet to harvest, the improved sizes of the soya bean pods assures them of doubling their yields.

The application of inoculants to soya beans before planting is a new technology introduced to the farmers this season. The inoculants which are safe and bio-friendly bacteria developed to boost the process of forming swellings and especially root swellings containing interdependent bacteria in soya beans have been most attractive to the farmers due to their potency.

Sarah Babor is the Zonal Vice Chairperson of SEND-GHANA’s Cooperative groups in the East Gonja District. “Though they planted late due to a protracted drought, the plants germinated very well with strong stems and their leaves are looking very green. At maturity, the pods are clearly bigger and many compared to our soya crops from previous years. Inoculants are very easy to apply. It involves a mixture with the seeds before planting. With what we see on our fields just a few days before we harvest, we are sure to make more than double yields from the what we use to harvest in previous years”.

The farmers acknowledged that, they have now found a solution to successful and low cost cultivation of soya, through the use of inoculants. 

Under the FOSTERING project, members of Family Based Farmer Cooperatives (FBFC) who are mainly farmers in the three districts are expected to benefit from sound and up-to-date agricultural technologies-planting in rows, timely weeding and fertilizer application, dibbling and drilling to apply fertilizer and burying fertilizer after application. 

Farmers were schooled on efficient harvesting methods; how to adapt to crop rotation in other to optimize the benefits of soya beans; and fixing of nitrogen into the soil for future cultivation. These agronomic practices when applied religiously will help boost soya bean production and raise the income levels of these farmers.

Story by Patience Seglah, Agric. Extension Field Officer, SEND-GHANA

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